Tribological Behaviour of Thin Organic Permanent Coatings Deposited on Hot-Dip Coated Steel Sheet - a Laboratory Study

Document identifier: oai:dalea.du.se:2667
Keyword: Thin organic coatings; Hot-dip coated steel; Forming; Tribological properties; Friction; Wear
Publication year: 2000
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SDG 9 Industry, innovation and infrastructure
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Abstract:

The forming and handling of hot-dip coated steel sheets is frequently associated with problems such as galling, scratching and discoloration. Recently, a new generation of thin organic coatings has been introduced on the market in order to improve the performance of hot-dip coated steel sheets and reduce these kinds of problems. In summary, these coatings have the potential to increase the formability of the steel sheet without additional lubrication, the anti-finger print properties and the corrosion protection of the product. Besides, they should also provide a pre-treatment for painting, i.e. they can be classified as permanent coatings. In the present study, the tribological behaviour of three different thin organic permanent coatings deposited on hot-dip coated (pure zinc and 55% Al–Zn) steel sheets is evaluated by three different laboratory tests; modified scratch testing, pin-on-disc testing and bending under tension testing. The results obtained show that all tests yield consistent and valuable information concerning the friction and wear properties of the materials and can, therefore, be used in order to study the tribology in sheet metal forming and the performance of different types of permanent coatings. Of the permanent coatings investigated, a pure organic coating shows the lowest coefficient of friction (µ close to 0.1) and the highest wear resistance, thus offering excellent anti-galling properties. In contrast, a mixed organic/inorganic coating displays a relatively high coefficient of friction (µ close to 0.3) and a significantly lower wear resistance. Surface analyses of the tested surfaces show that the thickness and coverage of the thin organic coating play an important role in controlling friction and wear. Furthermore, a thin organic coating optimized for improved formability and handling should display: a high adhesion to the underlying substrate material, a low coefficient of friction, a high load carrying capacity and a high intrinsic wear resistance.

Authors

Per Carlsson

Högskolan Dalarna; Materialvetenskap
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Ulf Bexell

Högskolan Dalarna; Materialvetenskap
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Mikael Olsson

Högskolan Dalarna; Materialvetenskap
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