The Hamburg meteorite fall

Fireball trajectory, orbit, and dynamics

Document identifier: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-75769
Access full text here:10.1111/maps.13368
Keyword: Engineering and Technology, Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering, Other Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering, Teknik och teknologier, Elektroteknik och elektronik, Annan elektroteknik och elektronik, Onboard space systems, Rymdtekniska system
Publication year: 2019
Relevant Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs):
SDG 9 Industry, innovation and infrastructure
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Abstract:

The Hamburg (H4) meteorite fell on 17 January 2018 at 01:08 UT approximately 10 km north of Ann Arbor, Michigan. More than two dozen fragments totaling under 1 kg were recovered, primarily from frozen lake surfaces. The fireball initial velocity was 15.83 ± 0.05 km s−1, based on four independent records showing the fireball above 50 km altitude. The radiant had a zenith angle of 66.14 ± 0.29° and an azimuth of 121.56 ± 1.2°. The resulting low inclination (<1°) Apollo‐type orbit has a large aphelion distance and Tisserand value relative to Jupiter (Tj) of ~3. Two major flares dominate the energy deposition profile, centered at 24.1 and 21.7 km altitude, respectively, under dynamic pressures of 5–7 MPa. The Geostationary Lightning Mapper on the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite‐16 also detected the two main flares and their relative timing and peak flux agree with the video‐derived brightness profile. Our preferred total energy for the Hamburg fireball is 2–7 T TNT (8.4–28 × 109 J), which corresponds to a likely initial mass in the range of 60–225 kg or diameter between 0.3 and 0.5 m. Based on the model of Granvik et al. (2018), the meteorite originated in an escape route from the mid to outer asteroid belt. Hamburg is the 14th known H chondrite with an instrumentally derived preatmospheric orbit, half of which have small (<5°) inclinations making connection with (6) Hebe problematic. A definitive parent body consistent with all 14 known H chondrite orbits remains elusive.

Authors

P.G. Brown

Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada. Centre for Planetary Science and Exploration, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario,Canada
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D. Vida

Department of Earth Sciences, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada
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D.E Moser

Jacobs Space Exploration Group, EV44/Meteoroid Environment Office, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama, USA
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Mikael Granvik

Luleå tekniska universitet; Rymdteknik; Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
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W.J Koshak

NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ST11 Robert Cramer Research Hall, Huntsville, Alabama, USA
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D. Chu

Chesapeake Aerospace LLC, Grasonville, Maryland,USA
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J. Steckloff

Planetary Science Institute, Tucson, Arizona, USA. Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USA
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A. Licata

Farmington Community Stargazers, Farmington Hills, Michigan, USA
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S. Hariri

Department of Physics and Astronomy, Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, Michigan, USA
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J. Mason

Orchard Ridge Campus, Oakland Community College, Farmington Hills, Michigan,USA
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M. Mazur

Department of Earth Sciences, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada
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W. Cooke

NASA Meteoroid Environment Office, Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama, USA
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Z. Krzeminski

Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada
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